2/9/10

Beds | Re-thinking the Dorm

I don't know about you, but I feel that most dorm rooms are terribly inefficient and poorly set up. The typical dorm room is a square cinder block box with a window, bulky furniture, and awkward layout. I know that nowadays when new residence halls are built, more thought is being put into the efficiency of the rooms. (For example, suite-style rooms are increasingly popular.) Some new dorms are extremely modern in style.

So I got to thinking about re-thinking the dorm. When a lot of people here "dorm room of the future" they think of high-tech, space-age, Jetsons-esque atmosphere. While I enjoy looking at such modern spaces, I prefer not to live in one. So what would be some easy ways to increase the function of a dorm room while maintaining a traditional, comfortable feel?

I think the most natural place to begin would be the bed. This is the largest piece of furniture in a dorm room and sleep is, after all, an important health factor. Dorm rooms function as so much more than a bedroom, though. So I've always thought it would be so nice to just... well, "tuck away" a bed. It would save so much floorspace. Murphy beds, trundle beds, and built-in beds would be a great way to save space in dorm rooms.

A Murphy bed would be an ideal space-saving solution for dorm rooms. For one, Murphy beds are not permanent and would not require any interior architectural work. At night, the bed can be let down (like above).
[above image source: Andrew Sinclair]
And then in the morning, it can be made and folded back up. (See above.) [above image source: Andrew Sinclair]
Just look at how much floor space a Murphy bed opens up. Additionally, depending on the type of Murphy bed, there can be a lot of storage options. In the Murphy bed pictured above, there's a built-in bookcase and dresser. [above image source: Andrew Sinclair]
Pictured above is another Murphy bed option that would be ideal for a college dorm room. It includes a dresser, bookcase, and desk area. Sooo efficient! [above image source: more space place nashville]

Bed nooks would allow for more privacy than dorm residents are used to. A curtain (above) could be pulled closed to hide the bed during the day or make for a more private sleeping space at night. [above image source: handmade charlotte]
Some bed nooks could even offer storage, such as the one pictured above. [above image source: townmouse]
The above bed nook offers a lot of clothing storage with four large dresser drawers. And the curtain allows for some privacy. [above image source: townmouse]
This style of bed nook (above) would work especially well in shared dorms. Captain-style drawers offer storage for clothing or shoes. Built-in bookcases offer storage for books, photo frames, and personal knick-knacks. And the separating wall offers privacy. [above image source: BPC Architecture]
Here's another built-in bed with a lot of storage. (See above.) [above image source: TK Smith]
Lastly, I believe the trundle bed would be a considerable option as well. Granted, it wouldn't exactly loan itself to privacy or extra storage options, but it would free up floor space by hiding away one bed during the day. [above image source: Mudrick]

If you could have one of these styles of bed in your dorm room, which would you pick? I think I would go with the bed nooks because they are just so cozy!

Stay tuned for more re-thinking the dorm.

Amore.

4 comments:

Chelsea Talks Smack said...

oooo, i'm super inspired by these pictures!

itsassimpleasthat said...

I would absolutely love to have my dorm look like any of these pictures. Great blog.

Best,

Hannah Katy

Miss Jessica said...

Thank you both! :)

flooring perth said...

I love the first bedroom concept. It looks very enticing. I also like the idea of using wooden bed which complements well with the color of the floor and the walls. It's also very unique and creative.